« LUTHERANS ARE FUN | Main | I HATE THIS KIND OF CRAP -- UPDATED »

Comments

annamal

Why

Arwen

It is terrifying to me that this faith based adjudication system is completely unmonitored. I used to work in a faith based 'Goods in the Woods' program and we were so careful about working with the kids and working FOR the kids. This kind of thing makes me sick.

Richard

Because the "two groups of people" detained have very different characteritics from one another. I know, I know, you'll equate humiliation at Gitmo with "torture," and you'll wring your hands over the rights of these poor men who were just tending their crops or some nonsense. Heard it all before, and so we'll just talk past each other on this issue, I suspect. Anyway, we're now both grossly off point.

Richard

Whoops, the above was in response to annamal.

ann adams

It's especially terrifying to me that some of the these camps are endorsed by the government. Not surprising, you understand since the Bill of Rights disappeared yesterday with the stroke of a pen.

Just terrifying.

Richard

I don't know ... The story doesn’t sound quite so compelling when you consider these. Sounds like there's been a long-running witch hunt.

____________________

February 24, 2006

ST. LOUIS (AP) -- Five employees of a Christian reform school have been cleared of child abuse charges nearly five years after they forced misbehaving students to stand in a manure pit and shovel cow waste.

Heartland Academy staff members Farah Abu Saada and Mike Peterson were acquitted Wednesday, ending the last of the cases against the workers. Charges against two others had previously been dropped, and another was found not guilty in an earlier case.

Read the rest here.

___________________

And this one from 2004:

Juvenile Officer Ordered to Pay More Than $800,000

KTVOTV3/August 16, 2004
By John Garlock

Hannibal, Mo. -- A federal judge has ordered a local juvenile officer to pay Northeast Missouri's Heartland Christian Academy hundreds of thousands of dollars in attorney fees and expenses.

The ruling was handed down Monday by Judge E. Richard Webber of U.S. District Court in Hannibal.

In late May, Heartland asked the court to make Mike Waddle of Kirksville, the Chief Juvenile Officer for Missouri's Second Judicial Circuit, pay in excess of one million dollars worth of attorney fees and related expenses stemming from a case brought against Heartland by local authorities.

On Monday, Judge Webber ordered Waddle to pay more than $808,000 to Heartland Christian Academy, located just south of Newark, Missouri.

Back in October 2001, Waddle headed up a mass removal of 115 students from Heartland, reportedly to protect them from alleged abuse at the home for troubled youngsters.

Since then, numerous hearings and even a federal trial have taken place. Earlier this year, Judge Webber issued a 163-page opinion stemming from last year's trial.

The judge's order bars local juvenile officers from taking Heartland children into protective custody again without meeting specified criteria.

In the ruling, Webber also accused Waddle of lying under oath about his reasons for the mass removal.

Waddle told KTVO Monday afternoon that he had not yet received a copy of the ruling and therefore could not comment at this time.

West Coast Arwen

(thread drift)
Whoa! Hi, Spicy Elf Arwen! I came over here and saw that I had commented, was confused, and saw that it was you...
Y'know, I've never met another Arwen in person, but I've got a few acquaintences now on the web. It's really cool.
Anyway, so as not to confuse myself, I'm going to start calling myself "West Coast Arwen". There y'go.
(/thread drift)

The Happy Feminist

That article you linked brings up an important distinction that People didn't report -- that the kids who were forced into the manure pit were being asked to shovel the manure as a punitive chore rather than just to shame them. Either way it probably doesn't meet the definition of child abuse, but it doesn't seem as egregious to me if it's a chore (that presumably someone would have to do) as opposed to just forcing them in their just because. On the other hand, I don't understand why the manure would be in a pit that would have to be shoveled in the first place -- and I am wondering if it was a make-work chore just because.

Either way, regardless of whether the place is legal or not, it sounds like it is surely damaging to kids, and that untold human suffering occurs there. The fact that it is unmonitored is very much cause for concern. I suspect it's not so much a "witch hunt" as the authorities being concerned about these kids but not having the law on their side.

Rex

Either way, regardless of whether the place is legal or not, it sounds like it is surely damaging to kids, and that untold human suffering occurs there. The fact that it is unmonitored is very much cause for concern. I suspect it's not so much a "witch hunt" as the authorities being concerned about these kids but not having the law on their side. - Happy

Ever since I spoke to some kids who had just been sent back home from these places, and having experienced it myself this is right on target. While the one I went to was an all boys affair, it was the same thing. Sleep deprivation, humilation, constant nearly tangible fear, how this creates a healthy body or mind is beyond me, really.

And you're right about the authorities looking into these places but not having the laws on their side, mainly because they do things that while not child abuse, border on it.

"Because the "two groups of people" detained have very different characteritics from one another. I know, I know, you'll equate humiliation at Gitmo with "torture," and you'll wring your hands over the rights of these poor men who were just tending their crops or some nonsense. Heard it all before, and so we'll just talk past each other on this issue, I suspect. Anyway, we're now both grossly off point."

No I will wring my hands because the US is using techniques such as waterboarding (simulated drowning),so-called "stress positions" (which has killed at least one US inmate) and hypothermia (which has killed at least one inmate at Bagram) which it had absolutely no trouble defining as torture when the Japanese or the Vietnamese (or the freaking Spanish Inquisition) were using them.

You are currently living in a country that has recently tortured people (no matter how monsterous)to *death* and you dare to talk to me about hand wringing.

The comments to this entry are closed.